Historic coastal destination

Located in Spain's Costa del Sol along the Mediterranean coast, Malaga dates to pre-Roman times. With a vibrant nightlife and cultural scene to go with its history, Malaga is a popular year-round attraction.

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When to go

While Malaga is inviting any time of year, July and August are the hottest part of the year and can make your stay a bit warmer than you would like in addition to the beaches being a bit too crowded then! Easter season is a particularly big deal in Malaga, and the Holy Week Processions are a sight to see. The end of August features nine days of festivals and fun as part of the Feria de Malaga. And while Malaga can be a bit unpredictable in terms of weather during winter, the Procession of the Three Holy Kings in January is also a common draw.

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Important travel facts 

In Malaga the cost of living is about half that of London, so a little money goes a long way. So too do local special offers such as the Menu del Dia meals offered at many restaurants at midday; these are multi-course meals that run from around EUR6 per person - quite a deal. Do be aware that many establishments are closed in the afternoons and only reopen in the evening, so plan your outings accordingly - no lunchtime shopping here! Malaga time is set to CET/CEST, which is one hour ahead of London time.

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Getting around and getting along

Most of the major attractions are easy to reach on foot, but take care to avoid the midday sun especially during the summer; parking is limited and taxis are expensive, so alternatives are mostly limited to buses. Single fares for buses within the city are roughly EUR1.30, to and from the airport around EUR3, and are a little cheaper with rechargeable passes. Accommodation is fairly reasonably priced, with budget hotel options starting at around EUR50 per night and hostels approaching single digits.

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